Military Divorce in Rockwall, TX

Rockwall Divorce Attorney Offering Legal Guidance

Military divorces are different from civilian divorces in that they have additional requirements, as well as additional protections. As a member of a military of a military spouse, you may have to file for divorce differently, wait longer to get divorced, divide your assets in a specific way, etc. Divorce can become complicated when one of the spouses is on active duty overseas. If you are undergoing a military divorce, you will need to have a full understanding of state and federal laws that apply to this process.

At my law firm, The Law Offices of J. Cameron Cowan, I can help you understand how these laws affect you, and I also help you take the appropriate steps for protecting your best interests in your military divorce. I am a Rockwall divorce attorney with a legal background that includes more than eight years of experience serving as a lawyer and reservist in the U.S. Army JAG Corps. During this time, I was able to extend legal counsel to thousands of soldiers and military personnel, as well as to their dependents.

How is military divorce different?

There are many different aspects of military divorce that differ from civilian divorce. Some of these aspects may make the divorce process easier, while other may actually make the process much more complex. Here are some of the various areas that will need to be considered:

The filing process—Before spouses in civilian marriages get divorced in Texas, at least one spouse must have been living in the state for the previous six months and in the county of the filing for the previous 90 days. If, however, a military member is a resident of Texas and of the county of the divorce filing but is absent due to his or her military service, that military member can still meet the residency requirements. The same applies for resident spouses of military members who are accompanying their husbands or wives during the time of service. Furthermore, those who are stationed in Texas for at least six months and in a Texas county for at least 90 days are also considered residents.

Divorce delays—The Servicemembers' Civil Relief Act (SCRA) allows for civil judicial proceedings (including divorce proceedings) of military members to be delayed for a certain period of time when those individuals are serving on active duty and unable to properly participate in the proceedings. The military member will need to take certain steps to get a "stay" (or hold) on the legal proceedings in order to ensure that he or she is not given a default judgment for failing to take part in the action.

Child Custody Issues—Setting up child custody and visitation arrangements can be even more complex for members of the military since military service usually requires deployments to other states and countries for extended periods of time. The divorcing parties will usually need to have a parenting plan that is even more detailed than most parenting plans. If the military member has sole custody of the child, certain arrangements will need to be made so that other individuals (such as family members) can retain temporary guardianship while the military parent is away.

Dividing Military Benefits—It can be difficult to understand the rules for how the various types of military pay and benefits are divided during this process. An attorney can provide insight into how the assets of both spouses must be divided under the appropriate state and federal laws. Military retirement benefits are handled differently than other types of military benefits.

Contact my firm so that I can help you ensure that your rights are best interests are being protected when you get a military divorce. Schedule a free 30-minute case evaluation today!

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